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I have to admit I am as drawn to the new as much as the old; the latest smart TV has been a pleasant diversion these last few winter nights; my iPhone is a constant companion; I am looking forward to the learning to make ebooks and other self-publishing adventures. But the Old Ways still hold me in thrall.

I was delighted to find a reference to an old way of curing duck legs- true Jambon de Canard- in a cherished old French book by Marie-Claude Gracia-La Belle Gasconne. Dried, salt-cured Magret de Canard or duck breasts from fatted ducks has been popular with the charcuterie set for some time. I consider it the entry level red meat to learn about what salt, time, humidity and temperature does to meat. A quick overnight cure and 10-14 days drying is enough to convince even the most nervous Nelly that curing meat at home is not only doable, but delicious. It what we start with on the first week of our butchery & charcuterie programs here at Camont.

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This long lost mention of Jambon or Ham from duck legs had me at the mention of “age-ing in ashes”. So I took the idea to task and started my 2015 charcuterie year with something new, something old. After boning out the thigh bone on these home-grown Muscovy duck legs (leaving the leg bon in the drumstick), I rubbed them generously in course salt and left them a couple days in the refrigerator to cure. The next day, I dried them off and rolled the boneless thigh into a tight roll and tied a handsome roll of knots all the way up to the end of the leg. A dusting of freshly ground pepper before wrapping in one layer of cheesecloth was all the spices this would need. The three legs went into a wooden wine box lined in brown paper and a thick layer of cold wood ashes from my beloved Jotul stove. I covered the legs with more ash and another loose layer of paper marked with the date.

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This week when called upon by a dear client to come and cook a festive frosty Sunday Lunch at a friend’s house near Bordeaux, I tossed on of the legs into my charcuterie basket. The thin slices of dried duck were salty, peppery and just right to accompany a lovely rose champagne as an aperitif. At Camont I would have served a sweeter offering like Floc de Gascogne or a fruity Cote de Gascogne.

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The rest of that meal was an homage to more Old Ways-

  • Cooking a perfect Magret-rare and juicy-and serving it with Vetou’s Triple Wine Sauce (red wine, red wine vinegar, and wine jelly). Vétou is working with me again and I love it!
  • A golden lobe of fresh foie gras was pan seared and served with a quickly made prune-infused vinegar glaze.
  • A winter tarte of apples and candied chestnuts with a GF cornmeal and chestnut flour butter pastry was served with a sip of afternoon armganac.

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Learning at Camont is what we call our new program of day classes, month long courses, and weekend workshops in 2015. And just to add something else new to the beginning of this year, I will be offering an 2-day Kitchen Charcuterie workshop in Duck- confit, rillettes, and salt curing and a little foe gras on the side. Here is what we will be doing on Jan 24 & 25:

Kitchen Charcuterie: The Fat Duck- Cooking Traditions in the Southwest of France

 Two nights & Two days in Gascony making confit, rillette & paté.

Jan 24- Saturday Arrive by train at the Gare d’Agen mid-morning and we go straight to Camont new Keeping Kitchen. Today we’ll breakdown and butchery whole foie gras ducks, salt them overnight for making confit tomorrow. In the afternoon, we’ll make rillettes, paté, and prepare the foie gras au torchon et en terrine.  Lunch before the cozy fire in Camont’s traditional kitchen.

Jan 25- After a quick visit to Agen’s weekly market, we’ll return to Camont and start the traditional confit cooking, in a copper kettle and outside, while we process the rillettes and paté in glass jars for you to take home. After a lovely Sunday lunch we’ll ‘can’ the confit for you to take home in jars, processed and shelf stable. Return by early evening train from Agen.

Each two-day workshop is 475€ and includes lunches; each participant will have an whole duck (6-7 kg) including foie gras to work with and take home. You can choose to add additional ducks for an additional materials costs (approx 50€ each including jars).  Each duck produces 4 jars of confit, 2 jars of rillettes, and 2 jars of paté. we’ll also pack up and ship them to you if desired.

To book or for more information fill in this little form!

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